Home > Uncategorized > Glutens Impact Goes Beyond Celiac – An interview with Dr. Fasano

Glutens Impact Goes Beyond Celiac – An interview with Dr. Fasano

Here is a blog post by Tender Foodie that includes a recent interview with Dr. Alessio Fasano and thought it was important enough to link to. I hope he doesn’t mind. What is critical here is that gluten has impacts on leaky-gut beyond celiac disease. If you have an autoimmune disease, grains are central to the problem.

How many forms of gluten reactions are there?
Dr. Fasano:  There are 3 forms.  Celiac Disease, and Gluten Sensitivity, and Gluten/Wheat Allergy – and there are four different types of wheat allergy that all behave differently.

What is behind all of these reactions?
Dr Fasano:  Gliadin.  Gliadin is one of the proteins found in gluten.  When someone has a reaction, it’s because gliadin cross talks with our cells, causes confusion, and as a result, causes the small intestine to leak.  Gliadin is a strange protein that our enzymes can’t break down from the amino acids (glutamine and proline) into elements small enough for us to digest.  Our enzymes can only break down the gliadin into peptides.  Peptides are too large to be absorbed properly through the small intestine.  Our intestinal walls or gates, then, have to separate in order to let the larger peptide through.  The immune system sees the peptide as an enemy and begins to attack.  The difference is that in a normal person, the intestinal walls close back up, the small intestine becomes normal again, and the peptides remain in the intestinal tract and are simply excreted before the immune system notices them.   In a person who reacts to  gluten, the walls stay open as long as you are consuming gluten.  How your body reacts (with a gluten sensitivity, wheat allergy or Celiac Disease) depends upon how long the gates stay open, the number of “enemies” let through and the number of soldiers that our immune system sends to defend our bodies.  For someone with Celiac Disease, the soldiers get confused and start shooting at the intestinal walls.

 That sounds like everyone is gluten intolerant in some way.  Is that true?  Everyone?
Dr Fasano: Yes.  No one can properly digest gluten.  We do not have the enzymes to break it down.  It all depends upon how well our intestinal walls close after we ingest it and how our immune system reacts to it.

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  1. Karen
    January 12, 2012 at 6:07 pm

    Have you seen this:

    An Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Inflammatory Bowel Disease; the IBD-AID
    Barbara Olendzki, Taryn Silverstein, Gioia Persuitte, Katherine Baldwin, Yunsheng Ma, David Cave University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

    This was presented in Hollywood, Florida in December at a conference on Advances in Research in IBD.

  2. January 12, 2012 at 9:51 pm

    Thanks for this. I had not seen it. I’d actually like to re-post it tomorrow. It is small but very impressive…especially considering my experience meeting one of the authors – Barbara – last year. I was troubled by here recommendation of soy. I did send her some articles, but she never continued the conversation. I guess she read them!

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