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Posts Tagged ‘IBD-AID Diet’

IBD Pilot Study Using Diet based on SCD shows 100% Success Rate

January 13, 2012 39 comments

It looks like the mainstream medical community may be finally realizing that diet is central to the cause and healing of IBD.  Last May, the folks at UMass led by Barbara Olendzki published a pilot test using a diet largely based on SCD to treat IBD. Here is a link to a pdf showing the study results, and I’ve copied the abstract below. I’m sure it will take alot more to completely turn things around, but this is a major step forward. Even though this study is small, I’d say a 100% success rate is pretty good!


And here is a link to the most recent SCD Lifestyle post and podcast interview of one of the researchers that conducted the study http://scdlifestyle.com/2012/02/umass-ibd-diet-study-sees-success/ Kudos to Steve Wright for putting this together!

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic non specific inflammatory conditions. Standard IBD treatment typically employs a combination of anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive medications; however, the pharmacological approach is not by itself curative. The Anti-Inflammatory Diet for IBD (IBD-AID), which is derived and augmented from The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), is a nutritional regimen that restricts the intake of complex carbohydrates such as refined sugar, gluten-based grains, and certain starches from the diet. These carbohydrates are thought to provide a substrate for pro-inflammatory bacteria. The second component of the diet involves the ingestion of pre- and probiotics to help restore an anti inflammatory environment.

Study Objective: To assess the efficacy and feasibility of the Anti –Inflammatory Diet (IBD-AID) intervention for the treatment of IBD.

Intervention: Patients were recruited from the UMMHC gastroenterology clinic upon referral from their gastroenterologist. They received individual instruction of the diet and its restrictions through 5 individual nutrition sessions over approximately a 6-10 month period. Support materials were provided. Cooking classes were also available to the patients.

Conclusion: This case series indicates the potential for the IBD-AID to be used as an adjunctive or alternative therapy for the treatment of IBD. Notably, 9 out of 11 patients were able to be managed without anti-TNF therapy, and 100% of the patients had their symptoms reduced. To make clear recommendations for its use in clinical practice, randomized trials are needed alongside strategies to improve acceptability and compliance with the IBD-AID.

Citation: Barbara C. Olendzki, Gioia Persuitte, Taryn Silverstein, Katherine Baldwin, David Cave, John K. Zawacki, Kanishka Bhattacharya, and Yunsheng Ma. “Pilot Testing a Novel Treatment for Inflammatory Bowel Disease” Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat.. May. 2011. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/barbara_olendzki/46